Improvement of Rams in railway systems.

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Improvement of Rams in railway systems.

During adverse weather conditions UK railway experiences a lot of coarse. The aim of this project is to extract autumn leaves, which cause damage to both the railhead and rolling stock wheels.

 

1. Title

On a separate page immediately following the cover of the report. You should also give your full name,

course and submission date below the title.

 

2. At the bottom of the title page you should show the following statement:

This report has been submitted for assessment towards a Master of Science degree in the

School of Engineering, London South Bank University.

This report is written in the author’s own words and all sources have been properly cited.

Author’s signature:

 

3. Abstract

A short summary (100-200 words) distilled from the introduction, conclusions and recommendations of

your report. It should tell the reader what your work is about and describe your main

results/achievements. The abstract should be written last, after the report is written.

 

4. Acknowledgements

It is usual to acknowledge your Supervisor and help given by Technical Support Staff and others as

appropriate at the start of the report.

 

5. Contents Page

 

6. Introduction

This ‘sets the scene’ and gives the reader a brief background to the general area of your project. Describe

in general terms what you are doing and why. The introduction should also guide the reader through your

report e.g. what is addressed where. This section should not exceed 1-2 sides.

 

7. Aims and Objectives

Aim

Give the main aim of your project. This is what you hope to achieve by the end of the project. Try to

make the aim specific. It should also be realistic and achievable.

Objectives

These are subsidiary aims whose completion will enable the main aim to be met. There can be several of

these. Again try to make them specific and measurable wherever possible.

 

8. Deliverables

Deliverables are the main outputs of the project e.g. the final report, any hardware you will construct,

software, user manuals etc. Deliverables are obviously related to the aims/objectives. List the key

deliverables for your project.

 

9. Technical Background and Context

This sets the scene for your project work in more detail and gives a description of the field. It reviews

and summarises the existing knowledge (theoretical, practical, experimental) available in the ‘literature’

(text books, journals, patents, etc) i.e. the work other people have done in the area. You need to critically

evaluate this work in the context of your project. Describe why you are doing the project and identify

where it makes a contribution to the area e.g. is the work you are doing going to improve anything, make

something more useful, add to the general understanding of the topic, etc. References must be given to

any literature you cite in your report.

Stick to the project theme.

This section and the references to published work should bring the reader to the point where he/she is in a

position to read and understand your report in detail.

10. Technical Approach

This is the `how you did it` part of the report. Describe exactly what you have done and the methods used.

Generally topics like specifications, design work, construction of equipment, testing and measurement

procedures, etc. are covered here. Any apparatus used to carry out experimental measurements should

also be described here. It is difficult to give examples covering all the different types of projects students

do because there are so many. If in any doubt discuss with your supervisor what should be covered. You

can always do things in more than one way and this section should also describe other methods you have

considered and the reasons for their rejection. You should also describe the technical problems you

encountered and your attempts to solve them. Don`t forget that experiments which go wrong can be

important too! Don`t winge about resources and make excuses. Any special safety considerations relating

to your work should also be mentioned here.

Organise this section using different sub-headings as appropriate for your work.

 

11. Results and Discussion

In this section you need to present your main results and analyse them in a critical manner against

models, expectations from theory, predictions, assumptions etc. Present all your data carefully, in tables

and graphs if appropriate. If the results are extensive, as they can be for experimental or developmental

projects (e.g. lots of data tables, graphs/figures, programme listings, etc), include the key ones in this

section and the rest in appendices, referring to the latter as necessary. State how significant you think the

work is and support your claims with evidence from your results, the literature, etc.

You must also give a discussion of the experimental errors associated with your measurements if you

have done an experimental project (covered in the RPM lectures).

This section can be divided into a separate results and a separate discussion section if you wish.

 

12. Conclusions and Recommendations for Further Work

Summarise your key findings and results, successes and failures and problems encountered. Assess the

work against the aims and objectives listed at the beginning of the report and the deliverables. Have you

met these? Try to put your work into the wider context of the area. Finish off with recommendations for

further work where you identify areas that need completing or further research which needs to be done.

The use of bullet points is a very effective way of listing the conclusions and is recommended.

 

13. Bibliography and References

A bibliography is a complete list of books and papers that you have consulted, whereas, references are

those works to which you have made specific reference in the report. References are essential; you can

include a separate bibliography if you wish. You must give the complete details for every work and use a

consistent format. Examples are:

Journal papers:

Authors, Title of Article, Title of Journal, Volume Number, page numbers (Year)

Example:

H S Reehal, M J Thwaites and T M Bruton, Thin Film Polycrystalline Silicon Solar Cells Prepared by

Plasma CVD, phys. stat. sol. (a) 154, 623-633 (1996)

G Shirkoohi, Dependence of Magnetisation near Saturation on Alloying Content in Ferromagnetic Steel,

IEEE Trans. Mag., VOL. 51, NO. 7, pp. 1-10 (2015)

Textbooks:

Authors, Title of Book, Publisher, Place of publication, (Year), ISBN Number

Example:

C Y Chang and S M Sze (Editors), ULSI Technology,McGraw-Hill, New York, (1996), ISBN 0-07-

063062-3

Also see Appendix 10. For further examples ask your supervisor. The University`s Study-Skills Survival

Guide for students also gives examples.

14. Project planning

You will be expected to use the skills acquired during the RPM lectures to plan your project work and

demonstrate the results of your planning in this section. A key aim of planning your project is to

ensure it can be completed in the time allotted (600 hours).Your planning must cover the period

from the start of your project to its conclusion.

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